Welfare access restricted is welfare denied – AITUC protests against Tamil Nadu Labour Welfare Board

July 31st, 2015 No comments

While Tamil Nadu Construction Workers Welfare Board has accumulated over Rs 1000 crores as cess for the social security of construction workers, the increased retrictions and inaccessibility to welfare schemes has workers and unions fuming. According to Labour Department, the cess received between 2011 and 2015 is over 330 crore Rupees, where as the disbursement is merely 163 crore rupees for the same period. The state of other welfare boards(Tamil Nadu has over 14 welfare boards providing social security for unorganized sector workers) is much worse as they do not have a cess for social security.

AITUC Construction Workers Protest2
Jayanthi, a tailor registered under Tamil Nadu Manual Workers Welfare board and a mother of 2 young children lives in Korukkupettai, North Chennai. The Labour Welfare board office was situated in Mint of North Chennai and was easier for her to access when applying for labour welfare schemes. The Mint office in predominanly working class neighborhood of North Chennai has been closed and moved to Anna Nagar, in East Chennai. More over, the Labour Department has also made it mandatory for workers to appear for not only registration but availing of labour welfare schemes. The restrictions in application of social security in tandem with consolidation of Labour Departments has severely restricted the access of social security for the unorganized sector workers in the city.

These issues and other demands were raised in a gherao protest organized by AITUC on July 21st in Chennai. Comrade S. Moorthy, North Chennai District Secretary of AITUC reflected that since the start of the labour welfare boards in 20 years, there has been no increase in the compensation of various welfare schemes. These include Rs 1 lakh for accidental death assistance, Rs50000 for natural death assistance, Rs 2000 for funeral assistance and Rs 6000 for maternity assistance. AITUC has demanded Rs 5 lakh for natural death, Rs 10 lakh for deaths due to accidents, 1 lakh Rs for marriage assistance, Rs 60000 for maternity assistance and Rs 25000 for funeral assistance. Comrade Moorthy also said that even the existing assitances are not paid timely as applications are rejected on flimsy excuses and workers asked to appear in person for every review. He condemned the sidelining of unions in the functioning of welfare boards and said this only makes the system more opaque.

Srinivasan, South Chennai District President of AITUC said that the ‘state Government collects cess from construction works mainly for providing welfare to the construction workers. Not disbursing what is workers’ funds to workers is tantamount to cheating’. Over 50 workers and union representatives participated in the gherao. Protestes were also held through out Tamil Nadu.

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நல வாரியக் கொள்கைகளை எதிர்த்து ஏஐடியுசி சங்க அமைப்பு சாரா தொழிலாளர்கள் போராட்டம்

July 31st, 2015 No comments

தொழிலாளர் நல வாரியங்களில் செயல்படுத்தப்படும் தொழிலாளர் விரோதப் போக்கை கண்டித்து, தமிழ்நாடு முழுவதும் மாவட்ட நலவாரிய முற்றுகைப் போராட்டங்கள் தமிழ்நாடு ஏஐடியுசி கட்டடத் தொழிலாளர் சங்கம் சார்பில் ஜுலை 21 அன்று நடை பெற்றது. சென்னை அண்னாநகரில் நடைபெற்ற இந்த போராட்டத்தில். 50க்கும் மேற்பட்ட தொழிலாளர்களும், சங்க பிரதிநிதிகளும் கலந்து கொண்டனர்.

AITUC Construction Workers Protest1

போராட்டத்தில் பேசிய வட சென்னை மாவட்டச் செயலாளர் தோழர் மூர்த்தி, “நலவாரியங்கள் செயல்படத் துவங்கி 20 வருட காலங்களில் தொழிலாளர்களின் நலப் பயன்கள் மாறவில்லை” எனக் குறிப்பிட்டார். தற்போது, இயற்கை மரணங்களுக்கு ரூ50000, வேலையில் ஏற்படும் மரணங்களுக்கு ரூ1 லட்சம், ஈமச்சடங்குகளுக்கு ரூ2000 மற்றும் பேறுகால உதிவிகளுக்கு ரூ6000 கொடுக்கப்படுகிறது. விபத்து மரணத்திற்கு ரூ 10 லட்சம், இயற்கை மரணத்திற்கு ரூ 5 லட்சம், திருமணத்திற்கு ரூ 1லட்சம், பிரசவகால உதவியாக ரூ60 ஆயிரம், ஈமச்சடங்குக்கு ரூ25 ஆயிரம் என உயர்த்த வேண்டி சங்கப் பிரதிநிதிகள் கோரிக்கைகள் எழுப்பினர்.

தற்போது கொடுக்கப்படு;ம் பயன்கள் கூட சரியாக கொடுக்கப்படுவதில்லை என்று தொழிலாளர்கள் கூறினர். தொழிலாளர் பதிவு மட்டுமன்றி பணப்பயன் மனுக்கள் கொடுப்பதற்கும், தொழிலாளர்கள் நேரில் வரவேண்டும் என்று தொழிலாளர் நலத் துறை கூறுகிறது. முன்பு மின்ட் அருகே இருந்த நல வாரியம் மூடப்பட்டு, அண்ணாநகருக்கு மாற்றப்பட்டு விட்டதால், தொழிலாளர் நேரில் வருவதற்கு மேலும் கடினமாக உள்ளதாக கொருக்குப்பேட்டையில் தையல் தொழிலாளராக வேலை செய்யும் ஜெயந்தி கூறினார். அமைப்புசாரா தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு வேலை செய்தாலே கூலி என்ற நிலைமையில், தொழிலாளர்களை நேரில் வரச் சொல்வது என்பது நலத்துறையின் தொழிலாளர் விரோதப் போக்கையை வெளிப்படுத்துகிறது. மேலும் அற்பமான காரணங்களை வைத்து மனுக்களை நிராகரிக்கும் நலத்துறை போக்கினை தோழர் மூர்த்தி சுட்டிக்காட்டினார்.

கட்டத் தொழிலாளர்கள் நலவாரியம் கட்டுமான பணிகளிலிருந்து ரூ1000 கோடிக்கு மேலாக வரியாக வசூலித்து உள்ளது. இந்த வரியின் நோக்கமே தொழிலாளர்களின் சமூகப்பாதுகாப்புக்குதான். இவ்வாறு வசூலிக்கப்படுகின்ற தொழிலாளர்களின் பணத்தை தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு தராமல் ஏய்க்கும் மாநில அரசின் செயல்பாட்டை கண்டித்தார் தென் சென்னை மாவட்ட தலைவர் தோழர் சீனிவாசன். தொழிலாளர் பதிவுகளில் தொழிற்சங்கங்களை புறக்கணிப்பதை கண்டித்தும், நலவாரியத்தை தன்னாட்சி அதிகாரம் கொண்ட முத்தரப்பு குழுவினை அமைத்து செயல்படுத்த வேண்டும் என்ற கோரிக்கைகள் ஆர்ப்பாட்டத்தில் எழுப்பப் பட்டது.

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Social Security is not a Charity, It is a Social Obligation

July 21st, 2015 No comments

says Harsha Mander at the Public Hearing on Pensions Issues in Tamilnadu

Pension Parishad, an All India coalition of mass organizations and NGOs working on issues of social security, organized a public hearing in Chennai on issues in implementation of pension and social security schemes in Tamilnadu at ICSA, Egmore or 21st July 2015. Making his concluding remarks, Harsh Mander, (retired IAS officer), Supreme Court appointed Commissioner on Food Security, pointed out the centrality of social security in a welfare state, maintaining that at no point should we allow these to be compared to charity. He said that these are obligations that we as a nation make to our citizens, who have worked hard and are now old, who have been disadvantaged due to social circumstance or have been discriminated against. The pensions and social welfare measures are a way of repaying our debt and protecting our fellow citizens in their time of need. Outlaying the various issues that had been discussed, he said “we always rate Tamilnadu as one of the best performing states when it comes to issues of social welfare and so it severely pains me to know about the difficulties people face here to avail their rights, it is also a grim reminder of how bad the condition is in the rest of the nation. We have a serious crisis here.”

 

Panel Members Listen to Testimonies

Panel Members Listen to Testimonies

Harsh Mander Making Concluding Remarks

Harsh Mander Making Concluding Remarks

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History of Trade Unionism – Public Meeting by Forum for IT Employees

July 21st, 2015 No comments

Sushmita

Forum for IT Employees(FITE) was formed in the aftermath of massive TCS lay-offs in late 2014-early 2015 and is made up of young workers working in IT companies. Besides job lay-offs, the group addresses various worker issues in IT industry including non-payment of salaries, biased appraisals etc. FITE has over one thousand members across India, of whom 250 are in Chennai. In an effort to promote unionization among IT workers, FITE organized a public meeting on the history of labour movement in India. Two speakers addressed the public: Comrade Vijayan, a veteran union leader in SPIC who has worked in Tuticorin, Chennai and Baroda, and Dr. V. Krishna Kumar, the President of Forum for Physiotherapists, Tamil Nadu.

According to Comrade Vijayan, the first industrial workers in England were migrants from villages who had been farmers or were in other occupations. They were uprooted and placed in new occupations in factories where they were now just individuals fighting for their rights. The working hours were long and they had no time for their family, the wages were low and housing was abysmal. In course of time workers realized that they were all facing the same issues. Their organizations gradually evolved from workers welfare committees and associations to trade unions. In response to their struggles, the English Government passed a series of laws called the Factory Acts which regulated the number of working hours, working conditions in factories and safety conditions .

In the 1850s, British systems of factory production were imported to India but not the protective laws, like the Factory Acts. In the nascent stage of labour struggle in India, labour issues were taken up by concerned. observers, like social reformers and journalists. Demands focused on working conditions for women and children. Workers started getting together to discuss issues in associations, clubs or sabhas. For example, the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants in India was one such society in 1897. The Madras and Calcutta Postal Unions were set up in 1907. These processes were similar to what happened in England.

Madras Labour Union, one of the first organized labour unions in India, was started by B.P.Wadia, a student of Annie Besant. The union launched a strike against abysmal working conditions in Binny Mills, Madras (aka Buckingham and Carnatic Mills). The workers went on a hunger strike, but the management did not budge. The workers were forced to go back to work. In 1921, there was another strike, which lasted for six months. The strike was finally broken up on caste grounds. After the strike ended, Binny Mills filed a case against B P Wadia. He was charged with inciting workers and causing the mills to lose money. The court ruled against Wadia and fined him Rs 71,000, which he could not pay. The court then ordered him to retire from public life.

The radicalism and outrage built up as a result of this strike led to the passage of the Indian Trade Union Act. Article 17 and 18 of the Act decriminalized trade unions. This Act gave workers the right to form a union. Specifically, a group consisting of a minimum of seven workers could register themselves as a Union. It is interesting to note that this law has still not been enforced in spirit. We see today in the case of IT workers, that people are still afraid of being associated to a union.

In the early stages of the independence movement (for example during the Binny mills strike), labour activism was connected to mainstream political parties (for example Congress). But this changed as India approached freedom in 1947. Mainstream politics started to adopt terms like ‘constructive criticism’ and ‘nation-building’ and distanced themselves from labour activism. For example, in February 1946, various units of the Royal Indian Navy went on strike. The ‘mutiny’ started as a complaint about substandard food on a vessel off the coast of Bombay, but it soon spread to other parts of the country. Sailors abroad a vessel off the coast of Karachi went on strike. Officers in Indian army and air force also refused to take orders. The Congress party and the Muslim League strongly criticized these actions.

The discussion after the talk was focussed on the practical challenges in building a union in current day workplace. The task of organizing labour has gotten much harder than it was before the 1990s. As an example, the Trade Union Act was amended in 2001 to require a minimum of 100 members for the registration of a trade union, instead of the 7 required by the Act of 1926. The speakers also discussed the difficulties of organizing in an industry (like IT) where no unions exist. Although some companies do not explicitly forbid union activities, most employees believe that they are not allowed to join a union. In a hostile environment like this, even if one is able to form a union in a company, the union will face challenges because of the absence of unions in rival companies. The presence of a union in a company may be used to tarnish the image of the company on the grounds that worker strikes could delay the products being delivered on time. In an environment where any worker organization is viewed suspiciously, the speakers recommended adopting tactful approaches. The goals of workers’ organizations can be presented as being in the interests of the management, as they address workers’ problems and thus increase efficiency. For example, a redressal mechanism for a biased reprisal given by an immediate supervisor might contribute to a better work environment overall. The speakers emphasized the importance of maintaining good personal relations with everybody in the workplace, as a lot of workers’ issues require solutions that involve complex interpersonal interactions. After all, the worker is not in conflict with the supervisor on a personal level. The conflict of interest arises because the capitalist mode of production assigns adversarial roles to the worker and supervisor.

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Workers from Diamond Engineering Plant arrested for protesting

June 30th, 2015 No comments

Over 350 workers of Diamond Engineering Steel Fabrication Plant in Mambakkam near Chennai, are striking against the labour violations of their management. Several workers have been imprisoned as the management took a high handed approach with the help of local police to suppress the workers’ solidarity. Judicial Magistrate Indira Gandhi has highlighted this aspect in a bail awarded to the imprisoned workers stating ‘Further there was a labour dispute pending before the labour court and the management ought to have resolved the dispute in labour court but have opted for prosecuting the workers through criminal court and obstruct their union activities”.

There are over 1300 workers in this plant, one of the three units of Diamond Group in this region. The male workforce is educated between 8th and ITI trained and has a work experience of over 5 to 15 years with this plant. The workers are from various districts of Tamil Nadu and also from other states predominantly from Assam, Orissa, Bihar and West Bengal. Workers from Nepal also working at the site.

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Suppression of Minimum Wages in the Garment Industry in Tamilnadu

June 27th, 2015 No comments

by  Com. CMeghna Sukumar (Labour Organizer at Garment And Fashion Workers Union;GAFWU)

 

GAFWU poster on denial of minimum wages in TN

 

The ready-made apparel industry in southern state of Tamil      Nadu employs millions of workers, especially women. As per    the State Government’s Textile and Handloom Department        Policy Note 2012, there were 4000 garment and hosiery units    in the State which employs close to 5 lakh workers. However,    considering the many small contract and sub contract units,     this figure is likely to be more. The industry has been                    routinely  recognised as one of the fastest growing segments      and  potential earner of foreign exchange as factories                 produce readymade apparel for leading brands in Europe and   United  States.

Tamil Nadu has two major hubs where the ready- made                 apparels are manufactured – Tiripur and Chennai. Chennai       has three major Special Economic Zones i.e Madras Export       Processing Zone in Tambaram, Apparel Park in Mahindra         World City in Maraimalai nagar and SIPCOT  in                           Irungattukottai. Apart from this many factories in other               industrial areas like Guindy and Ambattur. Almost 80% of garment workers in Chennai are women workers and today workers on an average earn about Rs.4000 to Rs.6000 per month. Often these are young women from agricultural families. As first generation industrial workers, they are viewed by the industry as a highly productive, yet dispensable and low cost workforce. Most of these young women travel 50kms from their villages by company provided vans and buses to work in large factories without any knowledge of their rights. Most do not know how to read a wage slip, let alone understand a legally mandated minimum wage. For women workers who live in the city, sky rocketing rents and increasing costs of living means living in a cycle of constant debt.

The Garment and Fashion Workers Union (3317/CNI) is an independent trade union of garment workers in Chennai. Since our inception in 2009, we have been campaigning for higher wages for workers in the industry, who continue to be amongst the lowest paid in the country. Karnataka and Gurgaon in fact have higher wages. In 2010, we found that the major reasons for this have been the suppression of minimum wages by the garment manufacturers through frivolous legal actions which have stalled the process of periodic wage revisions as per law.

The Minimum Wages Act was enacted in 1948 with the stated purpose of ensuring the protection of workers from bonded labour. The Act requires that each State in the country revise wages for every industry at least once every five years through a tripartite mechanism. There is also a Supreme Court mandated guideline to be followed in fixing the minimum wage. Food requirements, clothing, rent and housing, fuel, childrens education, medical expenses, etc have to be taken in consideration. However, in the case of the garment industry, the minimum wages have been revised in 1994 thereafter in 2004 and finally in December last year. Garment factory owners have been filing petitions in the High Court each time the government issues a notification and obtained interim injunctions. Till 2010, the government too did not push to defend its notification in court.

In August 2010, Garment and Fashion Workers Union impleaded in the pending cases and after a prolonged legal process, the interim injunction was lifted in 2012. Since the government no longer had any legal hurdles to revise the wages, our union, through various petitions, campaigns and dharnas pushed for revision of wages. GO 92 dated 12 December 2013    revised the wages as Rs 5511 per month for skilled workers and Rs5128 for unskilled workers per month. This was a  hike of Rs.3000 from the previous wage. (As per the 2004 notification, 10 years earlier, basic wages were Rs.2137 and Rs.1903 for skilled and unskilled category respectively).

In October 2014, GO59  was passed by the Government confirming the above wage and published in the TN Gazette in December 2014. Immediately more than 200 factory owners from Chennai, Coimbatore and Tiripur have filed petitions seeking to quash the GO. The factory owners claim that the wages are too high and that it will make the business unsustainable. They have also alleged that the government has failed to follow the due process in revision of wages. This is completely untrue as two months time was given from the time the preliminary notification was published in February 2014 till the notification was confirmed in October of the same year. During this time, no employer raised any objection. Instead they choose to file these petitions after the notification is confirmed, making it clear that the intention is to stall the implementation of the wage. This has been the modus operandi of the employers in stalling the minimum wages over the last two decades.

Once again GAFWU has impleaded in the case just before the Court closed for vacations and the case is likely to come up for hearing in the coming weeks. Meanwhile, on ground, GAFWU continues to campaign at the factory gate in an effort to unite workers and resist this attack on the minimum wage.

 

 

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சென்னையில் சர்வதேச வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர் தினம்

June 17th, 2015 No comments

தனக்காக நடத்தப்படும் போராட்டத்தில் ஒரு தொழிலாளர் கலந்து கொள்ள இயலவில்லை ஏனென்றால், அவர் செய்யும் வேலை நிலைமையில் விடுமுறைக்கான வழியே இல்லை. இதுதான் இன்றைய வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்களின் நிலைமை. பெண்களே இதுவரை செய்து வந்ததால், வீட்டு வேலை என்பது வேலையாகவே கருதப்படவில்லை. ஆனால் இன்றைய பொருளாதாரத்தில் நடுத்தர வர்க்க பெண்கள் வேலை செய்ய முட்படும் போது, வீட்டு வேலைகளை செய்வதற்கு தொழிலாளர் வர்க்க பெண் தொழிலாளர்களை நாடுகின்றனர். ஆனாலும் அரசாலும் சரி, அவர்களை வேலை வாங்கும் முதலாளிகளாலும் சரி, வீட்டு வேலை செய்பவர்களுக்கு தொழிலாளர்கள் என்ற உரிமை மறுக்கப்பட்டே வருகிறது. வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்களின் அடிப்படை உரிமைகளை நாட்டிட, உலகெங்கும் சர்வதேச வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர் தினம் ஜுன் 16ல் அனுசரிக்கப்பட்டது. சென்னையில், இந்தியத் தொழிற்சங்க மையத்துடன்(சி.ஐ.டி.யு) இணைந்து சென்னை பெருநகர வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்கள் சங்கமும், உழைக்கும் பெண்கள் ஒருங்கிணைப்பு குழுவும் இணைந்து, கீழ்கண்ட கோரிக்கைகளை வலியுறுத்தி, சென்னை வள்ளுவர் கோட்டத்தில் போராட்டம் நடத்தினர்.

  • வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு மணிக்கு ரூ50 ஆக குறைந்த பட்ச ஊதியம் நிர்ணயம் செய்தல்
  • வாரத்திற்கு ஒரு நாள் கட்டாய விடுமுறை. பண்டிகை நாளில் விடுமுறை
  • சர்வதேச தொழிலாளர் அமைப்பு ஐ.எல்.ஓ தீர்மானம் 189 ஐ அமல்படுத்த சடடரீதியான நடவடிக்கை எடுக்கப்பட வேண்டும்.
  • தொழிற் தகராறு தீர்க்கும் சட்டத்தில்(Industrial Disputes Act) வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்கள் சேர்க்கப்பட வேண்டும்.
  • வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு இ.எஸ்.ஐ மருத்துவ வசதி, பி.எஃப் ஓய்வூதியம் அமல்படுத்தப் படவேண்டும்.
  • தொழிலாளர் நல உதவிகளை பெற தொழிலாளரே நேரடியாக வரும் முறையை கைவிட வேண்டும்.
  • கிராம அதிகாரி, வருவாய் துறை கண்காணிப்பாளர்கள் மூலம் தொழிலாளர் பதிவுகளை சரிபார்த்தலை கைவிட வேண்டும்.
  • பெண் தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு 50 வயது முதல் ஓய்வூதியம் அளி;க்கவேண்டும்.
  • வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு இலவச பட்டாவுடம் வீடுகள் தரப்படவேண்டும்.

இந்த போராட்டத்தில், வீட்டு வேலை, நிறுவனங்களில் ஹவுஸ் கீப்பிங் வேலை செய்யும் தொழிலாளர்கள் உட்பட 50 பேர் கலந்து கொண்டனர். இதில் பேசிய தொழிலாளர் தலைவர்கள் வீட்டு வேலைத் தொழிலாளர்கள் வேலைக்கான மதிப்பை கோரவும், தொழிலாளர்கள் ஒண்றினைந்து போராட்டங்களை வலுப்படுத்தவும் கோரினர்.

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Domestic Workers Demand Recognition and Minimum Wage

June 17th, 2015 No comments

Workers commemorate the International Day of  Domestic Workers, (16th June), in Chennai

Household work is the most informal of informal work. While it had traditionally decended upon the women of the household to keep the homefront in order, it was never considered as labour. With changing life style, increasing number of households have begun to engage paid domestic workers to fulfill the great many tasks at home. Though it has now become a major contributor of employment, especially in the large unskilled category and though it overwhelmingly engages women workers, it remains the least regulated form of work with little government oversight. The foremost struggle for domestic workers is to make the state and the clients approach this as ‘work’ and those engaged as ‘legal workers’ with rigths that accrue to them. Highlighting this pitiable state of affairs and demanding basic rights, the Chennai metro domestic workers association, along with Working womens coordination committee affiliated to Center for India Trade Unions (CITU) organised a half a day demonstration at Vallurvakottam

 

The demands include

  • To notify a Minimum wage of Rs 50/- per hour for domestic workers
  • A weekly paid leave and leave during festivals as mandatory
  • Creating legal provisions to implement the ILO resolution 189
  • To Amend Industrial Disputes Act to include Domestic work within its ambit
  • To implement ESI, PF provisions for domestic workers
  • Exempt ‘in-person’ clause to avail welfare board benefits
  • Stop RI/VAO verification
  • provide pension for domestic workers from the age of 50
  • Provide free ‘Pattas’ to all domestic workers

the meeting that was presided by Com.Premavathi drew about 50 women including those working as housekeeping workers in companies. Many women cited that large numbers could not attend due to constraints of being domestic workers without any provision for leave. Speaking at the meeting, Com. Jayathi fromworking women’s coordiation committee said that the first and foremost is for domestic workers to feel proud of their employment and demand respect and recognition. Com. Appanu, district secretary of CITU, while demanding that  a survey of domestic workers to be undertaken, pointed out that their demands would be acheived only if they organize. Others from various faternal organizations also spoke at the meeting

find attached the leaflet released at the meeting

Domestic Workers Demonstration

Domestic Workers Demonstration

List of Demands

List of Demands

1

Leaflet Domestic Workers

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FICCI செயற்குழு உறுப்பினரின்  SPEL செமிகண்டக்டர்ஸ் தொழிற்சாலையில் தொழிலாளர்கள் உரிமை மறுப்பு

June 6th, 2015 No comments

மத்திய பிஜேபி அரசின் தொழிலாளர் உரிமைகளை பறிக்கும் தொழிலாளர் சட்ட சீர்திருத்த நடவடிக்கைகளில் பெரும் பங்கு வகிக்கிறது இந்திய வர்த்தகம் மற்றும் தொழில்நிறுவனங்களின் கூட்டமைப்பு (FICCI). தொழிற் சங்கம் அமைத்தல், கூட்டு பேரம் ஆகியவற்றை எதிர்த்து வருகின்றது இந்த அமைப்பு. இதில் செயற்குழு உறுப்பினராக உள்ள வாலிங்ரோ குழு, எஸ்.பி.இ.எல் செமி கண்டக்டர்ஸ் தொழிற்சாலையை 1988லிருந்து 25 வருடங்களாக நடத்தி வருகிறது. தொழிற்சங்கம் அமைத்ததற்காக, 20க்கும் மேற்பட்ட தொழிலாளர்களை இந்நிறுவனம் வேலையை விட்டு நீக்கியுள்ளது. மேலும் வேலை நிறுத்தத்தில் ஈடுபட்டதற்காக 25 தொழிலாளர்களை தற்காலிக பணிநீக்கம் செய்துள்ளது.

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இத்தொழிற்சாலையில் 450க்கும் மேற்பட்ட தொழிலாளர்கள் வேலை செய்து வருகின்றனர். இதில் 350க்கும் மேற்பட்ட தொழிலாளர்கள் நிரந்தரமாகவும், மற்ற தொழிலாளர்கள் தற்காலிகமாகவும் பணி புரிந்து வருகின்றனர். கடந்த 25 வருடங்களாக வேலை செய்து வரும் டிப்ளமோ, ஐடிஐ படித்த நிரந்தர தொழிலாளர்களுக்கு ஊதியம் ரூ 20000 ஆகும், 15 வருடங்களாக வேலை செய்யும் தொழிலாளர்களின் நிலைமை இன்னும் மோசம். அவர்களுக்கு ஊதியம் 10000ரூபாய் மட்டுமே. ஊதிய உயர்விற்கு கூட்டு பேர முறை அமல்படுத்தப்படுவதில்லை, நிறுவனத்தின் தயவில் அவ்வப் போது ரூ50 – ரூ170 என மிகக் குறைவான ஊதிய உயர்வே கொடுக்கப்படுகிறது எனத் தொழிலாளர்கள் கூறுகின்றனர்.

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SPEL Semiconductors Workers on indefinite strike

June 6th, 2015 No comments

While the website(http://valingro.com/) of SPEL Semiconductor’s parent group Valingro quotes Ralph Waldo Emerson “Do not go where the path may lead.. go instead where there is no path and leave a trail”, it seems to follow the well trodden path when it comes to labour violations in its semiconductor plant in Maraimalai nagar. More than 200 workers are on strike for over 50 days since April 2015. They are demanding reinstatement of 20+ workers who have been terminated and 20+ workers who have been suspended for engaging in unionization.

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SPEL Semiconductor(http://www.natronix.net/spel.htm), by its statement on its website, is the first and India’s only IC Assembly and testing site, was started in 1988 and has been operational for over 25 years. Its parent group’s chairman is an executive member of FICCI, which has lobbied successfully for the ongoing labour reforms1. The plant employs 350+ permanent workers and 100+ contract workers. Most of the permanent workers are ITI/diploma educated and have been working in the company from 10 to 25 years. According to these workers, workers with 10 years of experience earn a wage of Rs 10000 and those with 25 years of experience earn over Rs 23000. They say that any increment they get is at the inclination of the management, which has provided increments in the order of Rs 50-170 in the past.

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